5 Great Things to Do When You Visit the Farm

Those of us that live on the farm know how much work it is. But it’s also a lot of fun. Farmers love to share their livelihood with others. So whether you’re a city-type planning a “farm’cation” to a rural getaway OR you’re a family member returning home to show your kids your roots, the kid in you loves to visit the farm.

Here are 5 great things to do when you visit the farm.

#1 – Ask a Farmer Questions

Today’s farmer is a meteorologist, agronomist, biologist, mechanic, bookkeeper, promoter, rancher, environmentalist and so much more. Ask a farmer some questions about what they do, why they do it and how. You’ll find a wealth of information in your #farmcation.

#2 – Make a Snack to Bring to the Workers

Days on the farm are long and require lots of fuel, not just for the tractor, but for the body. Whip up some snacks or buy your own to take to a farmer. There’s nothing more welcome on a hot day than a break, a good snack and something cold to drink with a little friendly conversation.

#3 – See the Animals

Not much else unites children more than their love of animals. Whether it’s the family cat or the trusted dog, get out there and see the animals. More importantly, cattle and other livestock are a great way to engage children in something that interests them and teaches them a bit about where their food comes

#4 – Go for a Ride-Along

Safety is always first on the farm. But if you’re a grown adult or an old-enough child, riding along or climbing into that big cab can be a thrill. There’s a lot more technology in the cab of a tractor than that phone in your hand.

#5 – Run Around

A farm offers one of the last great places to just run around. Climbing a hill becomes a hiking adventure. Exploring a barn reveals secret hideaways. Dodging through a shelter belt makes a great place for hide and seek. And….you don’t have to be a kid to do it.

 

A farm is a great place to see something new. And even if it’s not new to you, it’s a whole new adventure for your children or that future agronomist, biologist or bookkeeper. Keep the family farm alive by going back to visit often and share the experience with future generations.

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